Monday, February 7, 2011

Ide Adobe--California State Historic Park

California's 278 state parks are in danger.  The states financial problems may mean that some will be closed.  Perhaps 278 is more than we need, the citizens are certainly unwilling or unable to support them all.  Hubby and I have been trying to visit as many as we can, while we can.  Recently we visited Ide Adobe SHP.
 One of the first things we noticed was this huge, 400 year old oak next to the adobe.  The house, built in 1852, is the only existing example of a gold-rush era adobe.
 Furnished as it would have been in the 1800s it allows us to step back in time.
 School programs help fourth graders learn what life was like and Adobe Day in August re-creates the ambiance of the era with music, dancing and pioneer crafts.
 Exhibits in the visitor's center tell of William Ide's involvement in the Bear Flag Revolt of 1846.  In that revolt American settlers captured the Mexican commandant Vallejo and established the California Republic. The California Republic (sometimes called the Bear Flag Republic)  lasted only 25 days before Navy Commodore John Sloat claimed California for the United States.
Researchers have determined that Ide never lived at the site but it continues to be called the "Ide Adobe". 
While we were touring the adobe we heard a large crash.  When we went outside we saw that a limb had fallen off the giant oak.  I don't know what the state will do.  It is a beautiful old tree but it is a hazard to visitors.

To find more views of our world, visit  That's My World, Tuesday; hosted for us by Klaus, Sandy, Wren and Sylvia.

15 comments:

ladyfi said...

What a charming place! Just hope that funding is found for places like these...

Gary said...

What a great tour. I'm always upset to hear of park closings. They're always the first to go, and once they're gone, they're gone. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Gaelyn said...

A nice park full of history. It's a shame when these parks don't have enough money to support themselves. In AZ, many state parks have been closed. A place like this is excellent for teaching history to everyone.

Sylvia K said...

What a great tour, Martha! And what an interesting place and history! I, too, hate to see that old, old tree cut down, but you're right, it is a hazard to visitors! Love all your photos as always! Hope you have a wonderful week!

Sylvia

Linda Reeder said...

I love big, old trees. I hope the oak can be saved.

Stella said...

Such a shame our children are going to lose such fine examples of history because we can't afford to support the park systems. Thanks for sharing such an interesting place.

Ishtar said...

I love stepping back in time! What a beautiful cottage!

Lesley said...

Such an austere life was lead back then. It is good to be reminded of it.

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Very interesting place. Oklahoma also has many more state parks than they can afford. They talk about privatization which really means basically just giving the property to investors who will build expensive golf course resorts with big gates to keep low lifes like me and my family out of them.

OK, I'll take a breath.

Paulie said...

What an interesting place and I am so glad you shared about the old tree -- glad it didn't injure anyone this time. It is hard to cut the old tree down just because it is old. . . I find it has earned its right to live and maybe a path should be made away from it to protect people. After all, just because people get old, they shouldn't be disposed of but treated in a manner of respect for their remaining years.

Kristin said...

Charming and interesting place of yours. Thanks for sharing this lovely information. Although it may be old, but I think it is important to preserve the rich heritage of the property. It's still so beautiful after so many years.

That's a huge and old tree. Don't see many of this often, especially in the urban world. Luckily the falling branch did not injured anyone. Anyways, its really beautiful, and bring you so close to nature.

It's great to have a field trip there for kids. Nice to have fourth graders learn and experience the life many years ago in this wonderful place.

The Summer Kitchen Girls said...

This is neat...suprised at the stone floor - all cabins had wood floors or dirt. Love visiting historical places like this - thanks for sharing it with us :)

Kay said...

Thank you for sharing this. I love places that remind and instruct us of the past. Your photos are beautiful!

Spiderdama said...

Great old place! I like this world:-)

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Great pictures -- I love historical tours like this. It is sad that funds are so low for important things in life. I can't imagine just shutting this one down. Is there a list of potential closures yet? Is there a chance that private firms will take over some of them? (I don't know if that's good or bad, I know it's happened in some other states and with the National Forest campgrounds.)