Monday, May 2, 2011

Day Eight

On day eight we covered a lot of territory.
 The first stop was Edge of Cedars Museum.  This is a Utah State Park in danger of loosing its funding.  It has an amazing collection of artifacts, well curated.  I had wished we had more time.
 The ruins on the the site included a kiva that visitors can climb down into.
 It was a cloudy day, if it had been sunny I could have captured shadows from the cutouts in this sculpture.
 The many sculptures were an added bonus to the site.
 The Next stop was Gouldings Trading Post for Navajo Tacos.  They seemed more like tostados to me but by any name they were quite good.
 The sky was perfect for this iconic image of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.
 Our final stop of the day was a Navajo Culture Center in Page, AZ.  I had mixed feelings about this place.  It wasn't run by the Navajo Nation and the man who ran it seemed to have an agenda beyond teaching about his culture.  We did learn some interesting facts about weaving and tradition but I left feeling conflicted.
These dancers were very good but they were dressed in the tradition of plains tribes doing dances from plains tribes.  We were told that Navajo dances couldn't be performed because it wasn't the proper season.
I would have rather spent more time at Edge of Cedars, there was a lot I didn't have time to see and I think I would have learned a lot more.

You can find many view of this wonderful world of ours at That's My World, Tuesday, hosted by Klaus, Sandy, Wren and Sylvia.



21 comments:

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

The State Park looks great. Too bad that it is about to lose its funding. Oklahoma is going to close several for the same reason.

The Tribal Park photo is beautiful.

Navajo tacos are a little different than the Mexican food. They are akin to tostadas I would have to agree.

The Plains Indian dances are just plain wrong.

Gary said...

Sorry to hear about the funding problem. A great tour tho' Martha. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Sylvia K said...

It is indeed sad to hear of the funding problems! Looks as though you had a great trip though1 Terrific post and photos as always, Martha! Hope you have a great day and start to the week! Enjoy!

Sylvia

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

A terrible shame that the State Park may have to close; I hope at least there are funds to ensure no damage to these wonderful artifacts. (It's always a shame to me when there isn't enough $ for park funding -- I'd rather my taxes go there -- but this one seems especially terrible to close.

It was an interesting day and I appreciate your honesty in telling us the good and the bad parts of a group tour.

Rajesh said...

Beautiful images from the Park. Wonderful treasure.

""rare*jonRez"" said...

Those are beautiful pictures and really really interesting sculptures! Thanks for sharing!


I have Finally Spring in my World entry at my blog. Hope you can visit me as well! :)

EG Wow said...

How sad that this park might lose its funding! There appears to be a lot to see here.

ewok1993 said...

Incredible. Sad that the park system has been deeply affected by the budget cuts. Some parks around here too are cutting down on hours.

forgetmenot said...

What a beautiful and interesting place to visit--sounds like you are learning so much as well as just seeing beautiful sights. Love your natural "bridge" or "arch"--really nice. Mickie :)

Carolyn Ford said...

I have been looking back on your 'trip' posts...OH...you have some beautiful photos! And, SO SO beautiful when enlarged to full screen! I have been to this area but so long ago...I am really craving a return and the sooner the better! LOVE the photos, Martha!

snowwhite said...

Amazing photos. I enjoyed tour with you. I hope their culture and this majestic scenery will last long, long time. Thank you for sharing. Have a Nice day!(^^)

Eve said...

Wow - what an adventure! And what an incredible location! I've wanted to visit that area for a long time, but it just hasn't happened yet.

SandyCarlson said...

West of here is incredible. Your photos are just amazing.

Annie said...

I remember, with great fondness, my trip to Monument Valley in 1972. I drove from San Diego to Phoenix; picked up a friend; and headed to the Grand Canyon and MV. There was no one in the valley. The hush was almost noisy. A local Navajo drove us through the valley in his truck and we stopped at a homestead. They were one of the few families allowed to live in the valley as it was their ancestral home. I was able to enter a hogan and weave on a blanket. The fragrance inside was divide as it was lined in cedar logs. It was and is, altogether, a beautiful memory.

Pat said...

The Edge of Cedars Museum looks fascinating....I like all the sculptures right out in the open desert. One of these days, I hope my hub and I will visit Monument Valley--I've seen so many photos of it and it looks so spectacular.

Wren said...

What a shame about the funding. I am afraid we're going to lose a lot of our heritage in these difficult financial times. But your lovely photos reminded me of how much I want to get to Monument Valley some day.

Stewart M said...

That is a classic view - and so short sighted of government to consider funding cuts.

Some people just dont get it - but why are so many of these in charge of the purse strings!

Stewart M

Denise said...

I'm sorry to hear about the fundings also. These places are sacred, a national treasure. We were out that way a few years ago now and I hope to go back one day. Monument Valley was beyond incredible. We met an English tourist at the overlook who directed us to see Antelope Canyon. We would never have known about it otherwise. Another incredible experience! Your photos are so enjoyable and bring back a lot of lovely memories.

katney said...

I am taking notes for our next trip through that area.

Kay L. Davies said...

Fascinating, Martha. These are places I want to see, although I might now have reservations (no pun intended) about the Navajo Cultural Center in Page.
We've been traveling all over the world, and now we think we might like to do North America by car, with our dog. (Motel 6, here we come, LOL.)
— K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

Truth Seeker said...

I found that the man running the Navajo Village Heritage Center was very knowledgable and knew lots about the Navajo Culture just the same as many others found him to be.